Thursday, May 26

Bergensselskap enters into a major contract with the Thon group. New technology will make it easier to recycle boss.

The real estate giant must become better at sustainability.

The company Carrot has signed a framework agreement with the Thon Group and several other companies to recycle, reuse and resell waste from shopping centers and other buildings. General manager Tore Totland has a strong belief that the agreement will be profitable.

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The young technology company Carrot AS based in Bergen is in a good mood right now. The company has signed a framework agreement with the Thon Group and several other companies to recycle, reuse and resell waste from shopping centers and other buildings.

General manager Tore Totland in Carrot thinks there can be a lot of gold in what we throw away, such as clothes, food waste and packaging. – Huge amounts of resources are wasted because we do not sort correctly, he believes.

– Better source sorting means that we increase the proportion of materials that can be used again. In our model, the companies that make an effort to sort are rewarded by gaining on, for example, resale. The agreement can be worth between 15 and 20 million, and we are confident that we will succeed, says Totland.

More on the customer list

Thon Gruppen is one of the country’s largest real estate companies. It owns 79 shopping centers in Norway and 11 in Sweden, and 80 hotels in Norway, the Netherlands and Belgium.

Kjetil Moen is assistant operations director in the Thon Group. In a press release, he writes that the Carrot project has “totally changed” how the company views waste.

– Before, it was mostly a problem, but we have realized that we actually handle valuable resources, he writes.

The company Carrot originated in BOB in Bergen, where the idea of ​​creating a digital solution for better control over the waste stream arose.

In addition to the Thon Group, Storebrand’s real estate company and BOB, Carrot also has Haugaland Interkommunale Miljøverk, Indre Hordaland Miljøverk and several other waste disposal companies on the customer list.

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Boss is starting to become big business, and this is the market Carrot is about to take pieces of.

The company, which until last autumn was called WasteIQ, has created a digital platform that makes it possible to collect data on how much and what type of waste different companies and households throw away.

This data can be used to motivate companies to reduce the amount of boss they produce, sort it better, and thus put resources back into the circular economy.

Operations Manager Geirmund Hopland at Vestkanten oversees the recycling plant at the shopping center. By systematically tracking bosses that can be reused, Vestkanten has gone from utilizing half of the waste from the shops, to 70 percent. During three months last year, the center collected, among other things, one tonne of coffee grounds.

Carrot has developed an app for the purpose. In it, for example, tenants at a shopping center can get information about how good they are at source sorting, and how they do it compared to other stores.

The boss must therefore be sorted in detail into several categories, which means that more of it can be used again.

– Previously, we lost all info in the boss has ended up in the container. We do not know what it is, who threw it, or how much it is. Our system gives us answers to all these things, before the boss ends up in the container, Totland says.

Better control of the boss

The technology will also facilitate models that reward good recyclers, for example where players pay less the less boss they throw away. This system is already in use in Bergen. After it was introduced, the amount of residual waste was reduced by nine percent.

Carrot’s technology is made by the company’s own developers.

– The goal is for the solution to provide control over resources that can be reused, from the time they leave the store, until they end up with a customer who can use it for something else, he says

– We have strong faith in our concept, and we have proven that it works on the West Bank, he says.

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The Thon-owned shopping center in Loddefjord has had a pilot project underway since 2019.

By systematically tracking bosses that can be reused, Vestkanten has gone from utilizing half of the waste from the shops, to 70 percent. During three months last year, the center collected, among other things, one tonne of coffee grounds.

– This means that much more of the boss will return to the cycle, and that there are customers who will buy it, says the Carrot boss.

He says that there is a demand for, among other things, coffee residues, which are used to grow mushrooms. Food waste is also valuable, as a raw material in biogas plants.

– In addition, there is a demand for recycled plastic. And the price of used Styrofoam is now higher than for newly produced Styrofoam, Totland says.

Almost-sinking Norway

Both the EU and the government here in Norway encourage people and companies to make sustainable choices that will speed up the circular economy.

Carrot believes there are enough resources to take off. Only in Norway did consumers and companies produce 11.6 million tonnes of waste in 2020. And Norway is no race for reuse and recycling.

In 2019, about 41 percent of household waste and other bosses from the business community in this country went back to the cycle.

It’s a long way from the goal in The EU’s so-called framework directive, where the goal is to reach 55 percent recycling by 2025, and 60 percent by 2030.

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Reference-www.aftenposten.no

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