Thursday, October 21

Riksdagen Drama: Voting Vocab Without Confidence


Photo by Michael Erhardsson from Pexels

Tensions escalated earlier this week when the Swedish parliament made history. They voted to overthrow Stefan Löfven, current Prime Minister and leader of the Social Democrats party. The hot topic? Rent control. With just a few days to plan your next move, and the Swedish government in an unstable position, what better time than now to brush up on politics? This week, we will cover the vocabulary center of the vote of no confidence that took place on Monday and meet some of the main characters of this political drama.

The government and parliament

Let’s set the stage a bit: Sweden is a constitutional monarchy (constitutional monarchy). The king serves as head of state but has little political power. The 349 members of Parliament (Parliament) are the ones running the show, addressing the national legislature. The current parliamentary members are 8 main parties (parties) that work together to form coalitions and voting blocs.

Government is the Swedish noun for “the government”. In this context, government it also refers to the current ruling government, the coalition that the prime minister has built. METERthe ice cream vote (the vote of no confidence) was approved by 181 representatives who voted against Löfven’s regering. Ready to meet some of the protagonists of this political scandal?! Here we go!

Main Characters and Parties – Main Characters and Parties

Stefan Löfven is he party leader (party leader) for him The Social Democrats – S (Social Democrats). The Social Democrats are credited with founding Sweden’s welfare system and were the dominant party in Sweden for decades. Usually in the center left of the political spectrum, this party has long experienced declining popularity. Löfven was named sPrime Minister (Prime Minister) of Sweden after the 2014 elections, when he formed a minority government with the Green Party.

Annie Lööf is he party leader for Centerpartiet – C (Center Party). The Center Party has been in coalition with S and therefore abstained in Monday’s vote. Downtown party He was in favor of removing rent caps for residents of apartment buildings in order to encourage developers to invest in new housing. They argue that the housing crisis (housing crisis) in big cities could be solved, but developers are afraid to invest in buildings where they cannot control the rental price themselves. Lööf says that issue is off the table for now after Monday’s vote.

Nooshi dadgostar it is The Left Party – V (Left Party) party leader. The Left Party It is a left party that the The Social Democrats they have depended on the majority of votes. But when the current government brought up the long-debated topic of rental (rental price), The Left Party it was not cooperative. V believes that removing the rent cap will skyrocket rent prices in an already competitive environment. Days before the vote in parliament, Dagdostar threatened to withdraw support and dismantle the current government. And that’s exactly what happened.

Jimmie Åkesson is he party leader for the nationalist party Sverigedemokraterna – SD (Sweden Democrats). He comes into play here because his party asked for the actual vote to take place. Interestingly here, we see the left and right sides of the political spectrum aligned when SD and V voted against Löfven. Although, Dagdostar de V had made it clear that his party would not allow a right-wing government majority to form.

Oh the irony! Oh the irony!

The irony is that Stefan Lofven himself is not in favor of removing the rent cap, but his party is. So, Löfven takes one for the team and becomes the first prime minister to lose such a motion of Parliament. According to Swedish law, Löfven has 1 week to decide whether new elections will be held in September or will ask the talman (prime minister) to form a new government in the meantime. It seems like there won’t be much midsummer fun happening for the S-parti fight this weekend. Boring!

Stay tuned!

This incident has become world news, so it won’t be too difficult to find a news source to follow. For political news in Swedish easy (in easy Swedish), 8sidor.se’s All voters is your guide.




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